Mexico City’s hottest tacos and gay parties

*Jean Paul Zapata published this piece on Gay Star News on March 4, 2014.

Mexico City's hottest tacos and gay partiesDon’t let the name fool you. Mexico’s Anal Magazine is an intellectual publication and has a highbrow following.

‘With a unique design, this magazine is dedicated to spread any kind of cultural expression of erotic nature or general interest to men who are not afraid to show their fascination for other men.’

The magazine’s logo is clever and well conceived; The content (no doubt provocative) extends to include literature, fashion and interviews; The publication has quickly established itself as a social force within the city’s LGBTI community.

Anal also puts on One Hell of A Party, the name given for its signature Halloween bash.
Three-year Mexico City resident and gay activist Enrique Torre Molina credits Anal Magazine with the city’s hottest dance floor. Facebook photos of previous parties corroborate these claims.

Torre Molina works with ‘media, non-profit organizations, companies, schools, and government agencies to promote respect for LGBT people,’ and has his fingers on the pulse of Mexico City’s culture scene.

He writes: ‘When I was in college in Puebla, I used to come to Mexico City about once a month. When I finally moved here three and a half years ago, I already knew my way around and had many friends living here. I especially like that there’s a lot of good theatre, and great people to meet every day. In this sense it’s very similar to New York, my other favorite city, where I lived for a little while. They remind me of each other.’

Here’s Enrique’s list of the best museums, theatres and tourist sights in Mexico City.

Favorite gay bar: Nicho and La Purísima.

Favorite any bar: Lilit.

Favorite dance floor: Anal Magazine’s Halloween party.

Favorite tourist sight: The view of the volcanoes when flying over Mexico City.

Mexico City's hottest tacos and gay parties2Favorite meal: Tacos at El Parnita and mascarpone cheesecake at Delirio.

Favorite getaway: Merida, Oaxaca, San Cristobal de las Casas.

Favorite breakfast: Eggs at El Péndulo and French toast at Carrez.

Favorite park: Chapultepec, around the Tamayo Museum.

Favorite café: El Péndulo.

Favorite hotel: St Regis.

Favorite festival: Festival Mix, which is the oldest LGBT film festival in Latin America.

Favorite bike ride: I don’t bike.

Favorite long walk: Reforma avenue and shopping in colonia Roma.

Mexico City's hottest tacos and gay parties3Favorite photo-op: My building’s rooftop terrace, and anywhere with photographer Oscar Morales.

Favorite museum: Museo Memoria y Tolerancia and Museo Franz Mayer.

Favorite beach: Puerto Escondido in Oaxaca.

Mexico City's hottest tacos and gay parties4Favorite place for a first date: Cineteca Nacional or the theatre.

Favorite shopping street: Colima street in colonia Roma and H&M in Santa Fe.

Favorite food market: Mercado de Medellin in colonia Roma.

Favorite art gallery: I’m not a gallery person, but I love the photo exhibits they do on the fences of Bosque de Chapultepec along Reforma avenue.

Favorite view: From the Chapultepec Castle terrace.

Favorite public art: Sculptures outside Bellas Artes.

Favorite thing in the city that defies categorization: Theatre at the Santa Martha Acatitla prison.

Favorite theatre space: Foro Shakespeare and Teatro Helenico.

Favorite gay media outlet: Betún magazine.

Favorite hidden treasure: It used to be Tia Maria, a gay piano bar in my neighborhood, which closed last year. I have yet to find my new favorite hidden treasure.

To get in touch with Enrique, visit his website or follow him on Twitter @etorremolina.

Mexico City's hottest tacos and gay parties5

Don’t let the name fool you. Mexico’s Anal Magazine is an intellectual publication and has a highbrow following.

‘With a unique design, this magazine is dedicated to spread any kind of cultural expression of erotic nature or general interest to men who are not afraid to show their fascination for other men.’

The magazine’s logo is clever and well conceived; The content (no doubt provocative) extends to include literature, fashion and interviews; The publication has quickly established itself as a social force within the city’s LGBTI community.

Anal also puts on One Hell of A Party, the name given for its signature Halloween bash.
Three-year Mexico City resident and gay activist Enrique Torre Molina credits Anal Magazine with the city’s hottest dance floor. Facebook photos of previous parties corroborate these claims.

Torre Molina works with ‘media, non-profit organizations, companies, schools, and government agencies to promote respect for LGBT people,’ and has his fingers on the pulse of Mexico City’s culture scene.

He writes: ‘When I was in college in Puebla, I used to come to Mexico City about once a month. When I finally moved here three and a half years ago, I already knew my way around and had many friends living here. I especially like that there’s a lot of good theatre, and great people to meet every day. In this sense it’s very similar to New York, my other favorite city, where I lived for a little while. They remind me of each other.’

Here’s Enrique’s list of the best museums, theatres and tourist sights in Mexico City.

Favorite gay bar: Nicho and La Purísima.

Favorite any bar: Lilit.

Favorite dance floor: Anal Magazine’s Halloween party.

Favorite tourist sight: The view of the volcanoes when flying over Mexico City.

– See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/mexico-citys-hottest-tacos-and-gay-parties040314#sthash.NWkkZshF.dpuf

Don’t let the name fool you. Mexico’s Anal Magazine is an intellectual publication and has a highbrow following.

‘With a unique design, this magazine is dedicated to spread any kind of cultural expression of erotic nature or general interest to men who are not afraid to show their fascination for other men.’

The magazine’s logo is clever and well conceived; The content (no doubt provocative) extends to include literature, fashion and interviews; The publication has quickly established itself as a social force within the city’s LGBTI community.

Anal also puts on One Hell of A Party, the name given for its signature Halloween bash.
Three-year Mexico City resident and gay activist Enrique Torre Molina credits Anal Magazine with the city’s hottest dance floor. Facebook photos of previous parties corroborate these claims.

Torre Molina works with ‘media, non-profit organizations, companies, schools, and government agencies to promote respect for LGBT people,’ and has his fingers on the pulse of Mexico City’s culture scene.

He writes: ‘When I was in college in Puebla, I used to come to Mexico City about once a month. When I finally moved here three and a half years ago, I already knew my way around and had many friends living here. I especially like that there’s a lot of good theatre, and great people to meet every day. In this sense it’s very similar to New York, my other favorite city, where I lived for a little while. They remind me of each other.’

Here’s Enrique’s list of the best museums, theatres and tourist sights in Mexico City.

Favorite gay bar: Nicho and La Purísima.

Favorite any bar: Lilit.

Favorite dance floor: Anal Magazine’s Halloween party.

Favorite tourist sight: The view of the volcanoes when flying over Mexico City.

– See more at: http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/mexico-citys-hottest-tacos-and-gay-parties040314#sthash.NWkkZshF.dpuf

Advertisements

Mexican Supreme Court rules on gay partner benefits

*This piece was originally published by Michael Lavers on Washington Blade on January 31, 2014.

Mexican Supreme Court rules on gay partner benefitsThe Mexican Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled the same-sex spouses of those who receive benefits under the country’s social security system must receive the same benefits as their heterosexual counterparts.

El Economista, a Mexican newspaper, reported the justices in a 3-2 ruling said the Mexican Social Security Institute – Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Spanish – must extend the same benefits that married heterosexual couples receive to gays and lesbians who have either tied the knot or entered into civil unions.

José Alberto Gómez Barroso, who married his partner in Mexico City in 2012, sought legal recourse through the Mexican judicial system after officials denied his request to add his spouse as a beneficiary under the country’s social security system. A lower court last year dismissed Gómez’s case after he passed away.

“The court’s ruling without a doubt is cause for celebration,” Alex Alí Méndez Díaz, a lawyer who filed lawsuits in 2011 and 2012 on behalf of three same-sex couples who tried to apply for marriage licenses in Oaxaca, told the Washington Blade. “The Supreme Court has been at the forefront of taking up decisions in relation to the rights of the LGBT community in Mexico.”

The ruling comes against the backdrop of the movement in support of marriage rights for same-sex couples in Mexico that continues to gain momentum.

The Mexican Supreme Court last February ruled the Oaxacan law that bans same-sex marriage is unconstitutional. States must also recognize gay nuptials that have taken place in Mexico City since the Mexican capital’s same-sex marriage law took effect in 2010.

A lesbian couple last month exchanged vows in Guadalajara in Jalisco. Gays and lesbians have also married in Colima, Chihuahua and in Quintana Roo and Yucatán on the Yucatán Peninsula on which the resort city of Cancún is located.

Same-sex couples in Baja California del Norte in which Tijuana is located and other states have sought marriage rights through the Mexican legal system. Coahuila currently extends property and inheritance rights and other limited legal protections to gays and lesbians.

“Since the legalization of same-sex marriage in Mexico City, the Mexican Social Security Institute has been one of the toughest organizations to lobby, one of the most stubborn institutions when it comes to amending their rules and giving equal treatment to its affiliates who have same-sex couples,” Enrique Torre Molina, an LGBT rights advocate and blogger in Mexico City, told the Blade on Thursday as he discussed the Mexican Social Security Institute ruling. “This is another step towards equality for gay and lesbian couples.”

Méndez stressed gay and lesbian Mexicans continue to suffer discrimination as long as they are unable to secure marriage rights.

“The court responded within the extent of its authority, but the result is insufficient,” he told the Blade. “The respect of human rights should be the general rule and its violation is an exception that must be addressed.”


2013, un año de avances para el matrimonio gay en México

*Esta nota la publicó Belén Zapata en CNN México el 26 de diciembre de 2013.

2013, un año de avances para el matrimonio gay en MéxicoTres años después de que se legalizara el matrimonio entre personas del mismo sexo en el Distrito Federal, parejas homosexuales por primera vez pudieron casarse fuera de la capital mexicana gracias a amparos, al tiempo que algunos estados aprobaron figuras legales similares para permitir las uniones gay.

Para algunos activistas, estos hechos reflejan que 2013 tuvo un “saldo positivo” para la comunidad homosexual.

“El matrimonio igualitario se ha convertido en los últimos años en el tema número uno en la agenda del movimiento gay”, dijo en entrevista el activista Enrique Torre Molina.

Durante el año, amparos permitieron que al menos cinco parejas homosexuales se casaran fuera del DF, hasta ahora la única entidad del país donde es legal el matrimonio entre personas del mismo sexo. Los enlaces se realizaron en Oaxaca (dos), Yucatán (uno), Chihuahua (uno) y Jalisco (uno).

Además, al menos otras 12 parejas más están a la espera de una resolución judicial o ya la obtuvieron pero aún no concretan enlace.

El activista Luis Guzmán, integrante del colectivo homosexual Codise, con sede en Guadalajara, consideró que en 2013 la comunidad gay consiguió lo que no se había logrado en más de tres años, desde que en 2010 la Suprema Corte de Justicia de la Nación (SCJN) declaró válida la reforma al Código Civil del DF que permitió los matrimonios entre personas del mismo sexo.

“Hemos demostrado que existen mecanismos mediante los cuales los ciudadanos y las ciudadanas pueden acceder a sus derechos sin pasar necesariamente por los congresos. Se sienta un precedente importante en esta materia”, dijo Alex Ali Méndez Díaz, coordinador de diferentes colectivos gay en México y abogado de las tres primeras parejas que obtuvieron un amparo para casarse.

En diciembre de 2009, el DF redefinió su concepto de matrimonio como la “unión libre de dos personas para realizar la comunidad de vida”. La reforma entró en vigor en marzo de 2010 y permitió que en su primer año de vigencia se casaran 700 parejas del mismo sexo y que dos mujeres fueran las primeras en adoptar un niño.

Antes, en 2007, Coahuila reformó su Código Civil y creó el pacto civil de solidaridad, lo que permite a personas del mismo sexo compartir derechos legales mediante un contrato.

Las reformas locales

Los amparos a favor del matrimonio gay en los estados tuvieron un antecedente en 2011, en el estado de Quintana Roo.

A finales de ese año, dos parejas del mismo sexo se casaron en el municipio de Lázaro Cárdenas, argumentando que el Código Civil indica que el matrimonio se integra por “personas” o “cónyuges”, sin indicar su género como en otros estados.

“Fue un caso curioso”, consideró Torre Molina, quien atribuyó el hecho a una omisión de los legisladores locales.

En los últimos tres años, además, algunos congresos estatales han iniciado la discusión de reformas para permitir las uniones entre personas del mismo sexo.

Durante 2013, esos debates tuvieron resultado en Jalisco y Colima, donde se aprobaron figuras legales que dan derechos a las parejas gay que decidan unirse, ya sea mediante un contrato o a través de una relación conyugal.

En Colima, el primer matrimonio gay se llevó a cabo en febrero de 2013, antes de la modificación al Código Civil. La unión entre dos varones se celebró en el municipio de Cuauhtémoc, luego de que las autoridades locales, basadas en el principio constitucional de la no discriminación, realizaron el enlace civil.

Seis meses después, en agosto, se publicó la reforma con la que se creó la figura de “enlaces conyugales”.

En Jalisco, considerado un estado conservador, cuna del mariachi y la charrería símbolos de la “hombría” del mexicano, se aprobó una Ley de Libre Convivencia que permite a las personas del mismo sexo tener derechos y obligaciones similares al de un matrimonio heterosexual.

Los debates pendientes

La discusión sobre el matrimonio gay llegó a finales de este año al Congreso de la Unión, donde los senadores del Partido de la Revolución Democrática (PRD), de izquierda, presentaron una iniciativa de reforma al Código Civil Federal para que ese tipo de uniones se reconozca en todo el país.

El tema todavía no es analizado en comisiones, aunque legisladores del gobernante Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI), primera fuerza en ambas cámaras, se han declarado abiertos a debatirlo.

Las parejas gay, mientras tanto, libran otras batallas por sus derechos. En mayo, atendiendo una resolución del Consejo Nacional para Prevenir la Discriminación (Conapred), el Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE) anunció que reconocerá a los matrimonios entre personas del mismo sexo.

Hasta entonces, el ISSSTE se había negado a reconocer sus derechos, argumentando que sus reglamentos solamente reconocen a matrimonios heterosexuales.

La Secretaría de Turismo, por otra parte, comenzó en octubre una campaña en redes para promover el turismo gay, en tanto operadores turísticos consideran que existe un “incipiente pero próspero” negocio de bodas y lunas de miel en este sector, principalmente en destinos de playa mexicanos.

A nivel internacional, el papa Francisco, líder mundial de la Iglesia católica, opositora al matrimonio entre personas del mismo sexo, envió señales de flexibilidad al declarar que él no juzga a los homosexuales y que éstos no deben ser marginados de la sociedad.

El Vaticano, además, inició este año una consulta a sacerdotes y obispos de todo el mundo para conocer su postura respecto al matrimonio homosexual, el divorcio y la anticoncepción, de cara a una reunión de religiosos en 2014 para discutir las enseñanzas de la Iglesia católica vinculada a asuntos familiares.


5 voces de la juventud

Brayan Fonseca, de Michoacán; Telmo Jiménez, de Oaxaca; Itzmaltzin Pacheco, de Hidalgo; Rodrigo Salazar, del Estado de México; y Alba Franco, del DF, son ex becarios de diferentes programas que tiene la Embajada de Estados Unidos con jóvenes de varios lugares de México (y del mundo) que pasan un par de semanas o meses en campamentos y universidades de Estados Unidos. Se forman en temas de ciencia, tecnología, procuración de fondos, emprendimiento. Una especie de boot camp de liderazgo para estudiantes de preparatoria y universidad. Al regresar a sus comunidades ponen en marcha proyectos con la ayuda de lo que aprendieron en el viaje y el acompañamiento de un mentor.

panelistas2La noche del 12 de agosto, por invitación de la embajada y con motivo del Día Internacional de la Juventud, me tocó moderar el panel “Voces de la Juventud” con esos cinco jóvenes en la Biblioteca Benjamín Franklin.

panelistas5La conversación fue sobre lo que perciben como los principales retos para la juventud actual, de qué manera los jóvenes son factores de cambio estratégico en sus comunidades, qué los motiva y a quién admiran. También les pregunté qué le dirían a jóvenes con ideas y ganas de arrancar algo, pero con miedo, falta de espacios o dinero o tiempo para hacerlo. Comparto algunos de sus comentarios, que me parecieron fascinantes y reveladores:

Ser joven es una ventaja, no un obstáculo, porque no representamos competencia para los adultos.

Somos más creativos, más prácticos, más idealistas. Y esto no es un punto débil sino lo que nos permite sentirnos más motivados.

Soy de Michoacán, donde la cultura del narcotráfico está muy presente. Tenemos que decirle al niño que escucha un narcocorrido y quiere crecer para ser narco, rodeado de mujeres y dinero fácil, que hay otros caminos al éxito.

Hay que moverse, tocar puertas, pedir opiniones y aceptarlas, estar dispuesto a cambiar tus ideas.

Un gran reto es la falta de oportunidades de educación y empleo que generan vacíos. El problema es que éstos los pueden llenar el narcotráfico o la prostitución como opciones de carrera.

Además de la migración jornalera, hay un problema de migración profesional: jóvenes preparados que no ven en México el lugar ideal para vivir y desarrollarse.

panelistas3panelistas4públicoGracias a Elizabeth Andión por la invitación. Más fotos en el Facebook de la Biblioteca Benjamín Franklin.


Tiempo de Análisis

El pasado 1 de mayo estuvimos Zac-Nicte Reyes, Alex Alí Méndez y yo en Tiempo de Análisis, el programa de la Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociales en Radio UNAM. Zac trabaja en el Programa Universitario de Estudios de Género de la UNAM. Alex es abogado, miembro del Frente Oaxaqueño por el Respeto y Reconocimiento de la Diversidad Sexual, y uno de los activistas más importantes hoy en México.

tiempo de análisisHablamos sobre el Día Internacional Contra la Homofobia y la Transfobia (que se conmemora cada 17 de mayo), las familias homoparantales y otros temas de diversidad sexual. El audio de esta conversación está disponible en este enlace.

tiempo de análisis2

Gracias a Guillermo Pineda por la invitación. Tiempo de Análisis se transmite cada miércoles a las 20:00 horas en 860 AM y a través de internet.